DVM Curriculum

DOCTOR OF VETERINARY MEDICINE (DVM) CURRICULUM

The College offers a six-year DVM program which includes a pre-veterinary curriculum taken in the College of Arts and Sciences. Students are required to complete 42 units of general education courses to acquire proficiency in communication skills and become familiar with art and literature, history and social and political theories.

In the veterinary proper curriculum, students register 163 units of veterinary subjects. The first two years of veterinary proper are concerned with basic and paraclinical veterinary courses while the third and fourth years of veterinary proper concentrate on clinical subjects. The students acquire theoretical knowledge and practical experience in animal production and in the diagnosis, prevention, treatment and control of clinical disorders in companion, exotic and farm animals.

 

Pre-veterinary Medicine Curriculum

Effective 1st semester 2002-2003, the DVM curriculum was revised to incorporate the requirements of the Revitalized General Education Program (RGEP) of the University. The RGEP was designed to offer wider choices of general education (GE) courses, thus broadening the students’ intellectual and cultural perspective.

As a result, the previous 36 units of prescribed GE courses were replaced by 42 units of non-prescribed GE courses. However 31-33 units GE courses were prescribed as foundation courses for the CVM proper curriculum.

In order to complete the 42 units, the students will have to choose their preferred GE courses under three domains as follows: Arts and Humanities (AH), 15 units; Social Sciences and Philosophy (SSP), 15 units; and Mathematics, Science and Technology (MST), 12 units.

 

 

Veterinary Proper Curriculum

 

There are a total of 163 units in the four-year veterinary proper curriculum. The first two years of veterinary proper are concerned with basic and paraclinical veterinary courses while the third and fourth years concentrate on medicine, surgical and clinical courses. Through these subjects, students acquire theoretical knowledge and practical experience in animal production and in the diagnosis, prevention, treatment and control of diseases and disorders in companion, exotic and farm animals. This curriculum would be revised in the near future to keep up with developments and needs in the veterinary industry.